Mounting Your Horse

Most horse owners know how to get on their horse; however, for many this can be an agonizing task.  Their horses move around while they are getting on, or their horse spooks or takes off as soon as their  leg is swung over the horse.  I’m going to give you some tips on mounting that will help eliminate these problem.

Probably the most important part of mounting your horse is making sure your horse is on level ground, there is nothing your horse can spook from or get hurt on, and that your cinch is tight.   Now we are ready to get on  our horse.

When I mount my horse,  I start out facing my horse.  I take hold of the left rein and ask my horse to turn his nose toward me.

With the rein in my hand I grab either my horses mane, the saddle swells or the saddle horn with my left hand and the back of the seat with my right.

I put my foot in the stirrup and pull myself straight up.

Standing in the left stirrup, I reach over my horse’s back and pet him on his right side.  This will let  him know that the rest of me is going to be coming over, and he will be less likely to spook when I throw my leg over.  (If you are riding an older horse or a horse that has been ridden countless times or a horse that you know and trust, this step is probably not necessary; however, on a horse that I’ve never ridden before or a green horse, I always test out the other side before getting on).

Swing your leg over your horse’s hindquarters taking care not to bump or spur him, sit down in your saddle and put your right foot into your right stirrup.  If your horse starts to move off while you are swinging your leg over or before you get your foot in the stirrup, you can pick up the right rein to stop him.  However, since you have his head flexed over, it is unlikely that he will try to walk away.

My horses are pretty good about standing still when being mounted, but it is not uncommon for a horse to move around when you put your foot in the stirrup.  The easiest way to fix this problem is to take your foot back out of the stirrup and  longe him with your reins in some small circles.  By doing this you are showing him that if he moves he’s going to have to continue moving.  Most horses would rather stand than work.  After a few circles, let your horse stop and try to mount again.  If he still won’t stand, run him in more circles.  Generally after a couple of tries, your horse will understand what you want and will stand still.  Some horses learn slower than others, and you may end up trying six or seven times before your horse stands still.

The following is a link to my video horse mounting.

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