Do It Yourself for the Average Horse Owner

Do It Yourself for the Average Horse Owner. What exactly does that mean? It means that this is a website designed to help normal people with their normal, day to day horse issues. The horses that I use are not professionally trained, show horses. My demonstrations are all done with horses that I or my friends own. In fact, the horse featured in most of the pictures and video, Dollar, is a horse that I acquired in a trade when he was only a yearling, and I have done all the training on him.  He’s not perfect, but he gets the job done.  I created this site, because most of the horse owners out there are just average people. They have their horses out in a pasture. They saddle and bridle their own horses. And for a many, they don’t do much with their horses except for the occasional weekend ride.

This site is designed to be easy to use.  It has step by step instructions with pictures that make it easy to follow.  Then many of my posts will also include a video showing how to do what was described in the post.  Eventually, the posts will also include links to other posts that tie in with what you are learning to do.  For example, the post on bridling will have a link to the post on how to train your horse to position his head while being bridled.  Right now the site is a work in progress, and I don’t have half the information on here that I want to get on here.  But as the weather gets better, I’ll be adding information day by day.

The training information that is going to be on this site is going to be broken down in very easy to follow step by step process.  The training videos will be performed using horses that don’t already know how to do the maneuver we are working on.  I know when I’m looking up “how to” information, it is very frustrating to watch a person explain how to train your horse to do something, and their horse does it perfectly in minutes.  For most of us in the real world, it doesn’t work like that.

Each post includes an area where you can comment.  All comments are welcome.  Please comment if there was something you found confusing or know of a way I can improve the information.  There is also a forum on here.  Hopefully that will take off and people will be able to ask questions or give tips, and get feed back from other horse owners.

So is this a site that is going to be useful to you?  This site is great for a new horse owner who is just learning how to do many of the tasks involved with horse owning.  This is also a great site for children that are just learning how to take care of their own horse.  Perhaps mom and dad are worn out from saddling and bridling their child’s horse for them.  This site is perfect for that.  Also if you are an experienced horse person and are stuck on how to get your horse to do a particular manuveor, this site could be for  you.  Not all horses respond the same to the same training.  I may offer a little different way of training the horse to do something, that may work on the horse your training.  Basically this site can be useful to anyone.

Thanks so much for stopping by,

Anna

Pictured is my daughter Mirandah and Dollar

Bridling Your Horse

Bridling your horse is the last piece of tack you’ll put on your horse before you head out to ride.  Following are the steps to bridle your horse.  In the near future. I will also be adding a video demonstrating a horse being bridled. There are several different ways to bridle a horse, this is the method I use it seams to work best for me and my kids.

1.  I take both reins and throw them around the horse’s neck.  That way if your horse starts to take off you can quickly grab the reins to stop him.  Then I remove the halter.  Some people like to fasten the halter back around the horses neck; however, I do not.  I’ve had horses pull back while I was bridling them with a halter around their neck, and when they hit the end of the rope the tend to panic.  This creates a dangerous situation for both you and your horse.

2.  Standing on the left side of your horse with the bridle in your left hand, use your right hand to cue your horse to drop his head and turn it slightly toward you.  If your horse isn’t trained to drop and turn his head, keep checking my horse training section for an article and video on how to train your horse to do this.  I hope to have it on here soon.


3.  With my right hand between the horse’s ears, I transfer the bridle from my left hand to my right.  With my left hand I then move the bit just below your horse’s lower lip.  With the bit here it is easy to just slide it up between his lips in the next step.

4. Now with your right hand you are going to pull the bridle up as you put the bit in your horse’s mouth with the left.  If your horse is reluctant to open his mouth for the bit you can insert your thumb into the side of his mouth and tickle his tongue.  It might take a little time, but typically they will open their mouth using this method.

5. Once the bit is in his mouth , you need to gently tuck his right ear into the bridle.

6. Then tuck the left ear into the bridle.  If you have a horse that is fussy about having his ears messed with, keep checking out the training section.  I do have a video and  article on desensitizing your horses ears coming.

7.  Finally fasten the throat latch of the bridle.

There are many different theories on how a bridle should fit on your horse.  I like the bit to sit in their mouth so that the corner of my horses mouth pulling up slightly.

Following is a link to my video on how to bridle your horse.