Do It Yourself for the Average Horse Owner

Do It Yourself for the Average Horse Owner. What exactly does that mean? It means that this is a website designed to help normal people with their normal, day to day horse issues. The horses that I use are not professionally trained, show horses. My demonstrations are all done with horses that I or my friends own. In fact, the horse featured in most of the pictures and video, Dollar, is a horse that I acquired in a trade when he was only a yearling, and I have done all the training on him.  He’s not perfect, but he gets the job done.  I created this site, because most of the horse owners out there are just average people. They have their horses out in a pasture. They saddle and bridle their own horses. And for a many, they don’t do much with their horses except for the occasional weekend ride.

This site is designed to be easy to use.  It has step by step instructions with pictures that make it easy to follow.  Then many of my posts will also include a video showing how to do what was described in the post.  Eventually, the posts will also include links to other posts that tie in with what you are learning to do.  For example, the post on bridling will have a link to the post on how to train your horse to position his head while being bridled.  Right now the site is a work in progress, and I don’t have half the information on here that I want to get on here.  But as the weather gets better, I’ll be adding information day by day.

The training information that is going to be on this site is going to be broken down in very easy to follow step by step process.  The training videos will be performed using horses that don’t already know how to do the maneuver we are working on.  I know when I’m looking up “how to” information, it is very frustrating to watch a person explain how to train your horse to do something, and their horse does it perfectly in minutes.  For most of us in the real world, it doesn’t work like that.

Each post includes an area where you can comment.  All comments are welcome.  Please comment if there was something you found confusing or know of a way I can improve the information.  There is also a forum on here.  Hopefully that will take off and people will be able to ask questions or give tips, and get feed back from other horse owners.

So is this a site that is going to be useful to you?  This site is great for a new horse owner who is just learning how to do many of the tasks involved with horse owning.  This is also a great site for children that are just learning how to take care of their own horse.  Perhaps mom and dad are worn out from saddling and bridling their child’s horse for them.  This site is perfect for that.  Also if you are an experienced horse person and are stuck on how to get your horse to do a particular manuveor, this site could be for  you.  Not all horses respond the same to the same training.  I may offer a little different way of training the horse to do something, that may work on the horse your training.  Basically this site can be useful to anyone.

Thanks so much for stopping by,

Anna

Pictured is my daughter Mirandah and Dollar

Saddling Your Horse

Knowing how to saddle your horse is an important step in learning how to ride.  Following are steps to safely saddle your horse.  In this demonstration the saddle has a rear cinch and a breast collar.  It is not necessary to have all that on your horse if you are just out for a leisurely ride.  I just have them included on here in case you decide to use them.

Let your horse see and sniff the saddle pad.  This will let the horse know what you are putting on him, and he will feel more secure about being saddled.

Rub the saddle pad on your horses neck and shoulder.  These lets the horse know it’s okay for the saddle pad to touch him.

Place pad on horse’s back.  You want the front of the pad to sit on the withers.

This is how I like to have my saddle before I approach my horse.  The off side (right side) stirrup and all the rigging (cinches and breast collar)  are on top of the saddle.  With the saddle like this you can sit it on the horse instead of throwing it on him.

Let your horse sniff the saddle so he knows what it is.  Then place the saddle on your horse and put the stirrup and rigging down on the off side.

I like to check to make sure that the center seam of the saddle pad and the thread on the center back of the saddle match up with the center of my horse.  I’ve had saddle pads that would make my saddle ride crooked if they weren’t matched up.

Lift up the front of the saddle pad slightly so that it doesn’t pull down on your horse’s withers.  I also like to  check to  make sure the front is centered.

As you reach for the cinch, you rub your hand along the horse’s belly.  This assures that he knows where you are and what you  are doing.  Always fasten your front cinch before any of the other rigging.  This way if your horse decides to act up, the saddle should stay in place.

Typically I run my billet through my cinch twice.   At this point  only make the cinch snug, not tight.  After I do a little ground work with my horse and I’m ready to mount up, I finish tightening the cinch.

Fasten the back cinch.  Make sure that your back cinch touches your horse’s belly.  I’ve seen people have their back cinches hanging a couple inches below the horse’s belly.  This can cause a major accident if your horse goes to kick at a fly or something and gets his foot caught up in the rear cinch.  The rear cinch doesn’t need to be tight, but you don’t want it hanging down.

Finally fasten the breast collar.  This you want to go over the points of the shoulders.  You want it to be secure but not overly tight.

Now your ready to go do your ground work.  Don’t forget to finish tightening your cinch before you mount up.  Below is a link to my video on how to saddle your horse.

Thanks to Gabby, Mirandah  and Dollar for being so great and helping me today.